Considering 4FRNT Skis? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

4FRNT Skis

Are you looking for a new pair of skis? If so, you may want to check out a set from 4FRNT Skis. Sure, the name might be hard to pronounce, but it’s certainly memorable. And, if you’ve spent any time around the new school skiing movement, you’re already acquainted with 4FRNT. If not, just picture all those commercials of freeskiing stunts on ungroomed alpine runs, and you’ll get an idea of new school skiing.

You don’t need to be hurtling through the air to enjoy a pair of 4FRNT skis, however. I’m the type of skier who prefers to enjoy my trip down the hill. I’m less Red Bull and more Life Insurance, but that doesn’t stop me from strapping performance skis to my boots when I hit the slopes. We here at SkiingStar recommend that you try as many different brands of skis as you can. Who knows, maybe you’ll surprise yourself and become the next mogul gold medalist?

All About 4FRNT Skis


4FRNT

If there’s one thing 4FRNT knows, it’s skiing. Matt Sterbenz founded the company in 2002. He’s a professional skier who wanted a rider-owned and operated ski company that cared more about skiers than shareholders. 4FRNT was the first rider-owned ski company which started a successful trend in skiing.

Most of 4FRNT’s skis are manufactured in Europe, although the company produces some in Salt Lake City. However, all of the skis are designed and modeled in “The White Room” in the company’s Salt Lake City headquarters. Here, new ski concepts get built by skiers and tested on the nearby Wasatch Mountains. This allows 4FRNT to bring new ideas to market quickly. The fact that skiers are the ones who operate the company and create the skis means 4FRNT Skis are very popular among enthusiasts.

Matt Sterbenz sold 4FRNT to fellow skier Jason Levinthal in 2014 and took a position as the company's brand director. In August 2018 he stepped down from the company entirely.

While 4FRNT constantly designs new skis, there are five main categories these skis fall into. Mountain skis, freeride skis, freestyle skis, and women’s skis. There’s also a line of kid’s skis, to get the little ones excited about the sport.

How We Reviewed


To learn all we could about 4FRNT Skis, we did some deep digging. First, we visited 4FRNT’s website and learned what they had to say about themselves. We also checked out some of their claims, such as the 4FRNT Skis MSP 99 ski winning awards (it’s all true: that ski won a lot of awards).

Finally, we compared 4FRNT Skis offerings to the competition, to see how they stack up. All of this gave us an excellent idea of what kind of gear 4FRNT Skis is selling. While we usually include customer reviews as an important part of our own, these aren't skis you can just pick up, or review, on Amazon. These niche skis are well-known, by skiers, and for serious skiers.

Specifications of 4FRNT Skis


4FRNT Skis has a solid line of skis for every type of rider, from traditional downhill cruisers to renegade freestylers, to little tykes just getting used to the powder.

All Mountain skis

4FRNT THE RAVEN

THE RAVEN

  • 177 cm
  • 184 cm
  • 190 cm

LENGTH:

190 cm

DIMENSIONS:

121-104-113 mm

WEIGHT:

1850 gr


4FRNT THE HOJI

THE HOJI

  • 179 cm
  • 187 cm
  • 195 cm

LENGTH:

179 cm

DIMENSIONS:

129-112-120 mm

WEIGHT:

1840 gr


4FRNT The Renegade

THE RENEGADE

  • 184 cm
  • 191 cm

LENGTH:

191 cm

DIMENSIONS:

138-122-131 mm

WEIGHT:

2075 gr


If you’re looking for backcountry freeride fun, 4FRNT Skis has three models for you. These are the Raven, the Hoji, and the Renegade. The Raven is one of the newest skis in 4FRNT’s lineup. Designed and built by celebrity freerider Eric Hjorleifson, it is light and playful.

Meanwhile, the Hoji is for exploring big mountains. A reverse camber allows you to drive the ski underfoot, forcing the tips to rise above the pow and easing all friction on the ski. Then there’s the Renegade, which is for hurtling at high speed down untested mountain runs. The tip is wide, and the waist is thin, giving exceptional handling at extremely high speed

Freeride skis

Freeride skis MSP 99

MSP 99

  • 171 cm
  • 176 cm
  • 181 cm
  • 187 cm

LENGTH:

176 cm

DIMENSIONS:

133-99-122 mm

WEIGHT:

1950 gr


Freeride skis MSP 107

MSP 107

  • 175 cm
  • 181 cm
  • 187 cm

LENGTH:

187 cm

DIMENSIONS:

139-107-129 mm

WEIGHT:

2210 gr


4FRNT’s downhill skis come in two flavors: the MSP 99 or the MSP 107. The MSP 99 is Matt Sterbenz's creation and is the company’s most popular ski. The ski has a big shovel design at the head and a lovely gradual rise in the rocker and tail. It glides over the powder, which is why it has won several awards. The MSP 107 is the larger version of the MSP 99. It’s wider yet has a tight sidecut. If you want to fly down a mountain with confidence and ease, the MSP 107 is the ski for you. Both of these mountain skis cost between $599 and $649.

Women’s skis

Women’s skis MSP W

MSP W

  • 159 cm
  • 165 cm
  • 171 cm
  • 176 cm

LENGTH:

176 cm

DIMENSIONS:

133-99-122 mm

WEIGHT:

1950 gr


Women’s skis HOJI W

HOJI W

  • 171 cm
  • 179 cm

LENGTH:

179 cm

DIMENSIONS:

129-112-120 mm

WEIGHT:

1840 gr


4FRNT skis for women have women designers, women test them, and are specifically intended for use by women. There are two models to choose from, the MSP W and the Hoji W. The MSP W is for hitting the mountain hard and with confidence. It has the same wide tip and gradual rocker rise that made the MSP 99 famous. Next, the Hoji W is for when you want to freeride down the mountain. Its reverse camber keeps your tips above the pow, yet the ski is stable and evenly weighted. Expect to pay between $499 and $599 for these skis.

Kid’s skis

 Kid’s skis The Jackal

THE JACKAL

  • 127 cm
  • 137 cm
  • 147 cm

LENGTH:

127 cm

DIMENSIONS:

112-81-107 mm

WEIGHT:

1000 gr


 Kid’s skis The Coyote

THE COYOTE

  • 137 cm
  • 147 cm
  • 157 cm

LENGTH:

157 cm

DIMENSIONS:

128-110-128 mm

WEIGHT:

1600 gr


If kids didn’t get into skiing, the sport would have died out a century ago. Thankfully companies like 4FRNT think of the little ones. 4FRNT Skis has two platforms for children, the Jackal and the Coyote. The Jackal is great for kids who are strapping on their first skis. This is a stable platform with a wider waist, giving the young one more confidence.

Meanwhile, the Coyote is for more advanced children who want off the bunny hill and onto the real slopes. It has an extra-wide shape to glide over the powder. These skis cost between $199 and $299.

4FRNT Skis Pros and Cons


Because 4FRNT Skis are an indie outfit serving a rather niche market, you may consider just buying a larger brand name and calling it a day. However, consider all the good things 4FRNT Skis have going for them, along with the bad.

Pros

  • Designed by skiers for skiers
  • Stylish
  • Excellent handling in all sorts of powder
  • Innovative design and technology in each ski

Cons

  • Hard to find
  • Expensive
  • Mainly for experienced skiers

How They Compare To Other Skis


To compare 4FRNT Skis to its competitors, we chose four common brands that you’re most likely to come across during your research. We wanted to make sure that each type of ski got addressed, so we looked at a mountain ski, a freestyle ski, a women’s ski, and of course, a kid’s ski. We went to each company’s website to learn a little about them.

5 out of 5 stars

First up in our comparison are mountain skis from one of the biggest names in skis: Rossignol. This French company has been pumping out skis since 1907. They’re the official ski sponsor of a dozen gold-medalist Olympians, and one of the biggest ski manufacturers in the world. You can find a set of Rossignol in any ski shop on the planet.

The Rossignol Experience 100 HD mountain skis are a carbon alloy with an extended sidecut. The ski is designed for experienced skiers because the damp edge grip allows the ski to power downhill like you wouldn’t believe. If you want speed, and you know what you’re doing, you may want to consider this beast. It’s cheaper than 4FRNT Skis, too. You can buy a set for between $300 and $400.

Nordica NRGY 100 Skis Black Mens Sz 185cm
  • Terrain: All-Mountain
  • Dimensions: 136-100-120
  • All Mountain CamRock

4.7 out of 5 stars

Next in our comparison are the lightweight Nordica NRGy 100 freestyle skis. Nordica is the second largest ski manufacturer in the world, and you’re no doubt familiar with their skis. Nordica is an Italian company that’s been giving the world performance skis since 1939. They became prominent when Zeno Colo won the Giant Slalom World Championships in 1950 while wearing a pair of Nordica skis. Since then, they’ve sponsored several world champions and Olympic gold medalists.

The NRGy 100 skis have a lightweight poplar beechwood core with a flexible bridge that makes the skis extra springy. These skis will shred any terrain you put in front of them, and they’re particularly happy when they’re airborne, so if you get a pair prepare to spend a lot of time enjoying a breeze. These skis cost between $399 and $699, depending on size.

K2 2018 Luv 75 156cm Womens Skis w/ERP 10 Bindings
  • Waist Width: 75mm
  • Profile: Catch Free Rocker, 115/75/106
  • Construction: Cap construction

4.7 out of 5 stars

While Rossignol and Nordica make performance skis for women, they don’t have the same dedication to women skiers that 4FRNT Skis shows. K2 is another brand that designs skis for women, by women. K2 Sports, just outside of Seattle, employs a couple of world champion skiers to help them design new models. The company pioneered the fiberglass ski when they first started, back in 1962.

The K2 Luv 75 is designed with a catch-free rocker profile so lighter women won’t have to worry about skidding out on a turn. These skis are super-maneuverable, something smaller women will appreciate. You can buy them for between $500 and $599.

Lucky Bums Kids’ Beginners skis

Finally, we have skis for the next generation of skiers. One day these kids will be the adults we admire for their prowess and talent, so it’s important that they have the right gear today. Lucky Bums is doing just that. Based in Boise, ID, Lucky Bums is devoted to making outdoor gear for children and families. You can find Lucky Bums beach toys, pool gear, skis and toboggans, and so much more. They’ve been helping families have fun since 2003.

The Lucky Bum’s Kids Beginner skis are for young children aged five and under. These are a kid’s first pair of skis, so they have flexible bindings, scales on the bottom of the ski for better traction, and rounded edges for safety. Also, there are no metal parts on these skis. Kids can have fun learning how to stand and, more importantly, how to fall, while parents don’t have to worry about blood loss.

These skis cost between $35 and $50, making them the most affordable kids’ skis on the market.

Our Verdict


If you’re wondering whether or not we think you should buy a set of 4FRNT skis, we’ve got bad news for you. What we think doesn’t matter. It’s what works best for you that counts. We’re skiing enthusiasts and we want everyone to enjoy the sport. If that means a solid pair of Rossignols is better for you, then that’s the ski you should buy.

That being said, we are madly in love with 4FRNT Skis. We love the company, we love its founder, and we love that each ski is created, built, and tested by a real skier in their White Room. 4FRNT Skis is devoted to the sport of skiing, and we fully appreciate them for that. If you’re a seasoned skier, or you feel confident enough to become more experienced rather quickly, then we wholeheartedly endorse your purchase of an awesome set of 4FRNT Skis!